The innovation of Auto-Tune

One of the most innovative, and I would now say crucial developments in electronic music has to be the invention of vocal processors. I would place a big wager saying that all dubstep, electronic and dance music pieces feature vocals that have processing applied to them. It gives them their silky smooth feeling, and when over done make the voice sound pure, and flawless like todays computerized synthesizers.

 First released in 1997 it became an instant success. The first major artist to use the new founded technology was Cher. Only recently had people started to realize the magic of her voice had been altered and processed. Today, it along with Melodyne, is a part of almost every radio released single. Auto-Tune is now the essence of any electronic music that features vocals. Sometimes subtly used, other times like in the likes of T-Pain, all the knobs are cranked to eleven, and the effects can be heard plain as day. Whether you think the tool is a crutch for singers lacking in talent or not, its wide use has made it a go to choice for every dance and electronic track. Where computers have taken control over everything and replaced acoustic drums, analogue synths and every other instrument imaginable; auto-tune has taken over the need for raw authentic vocal performances. In a way I do think it takes away the musicality. But at the same time, if we all we ever wanted was musicality in its rawest form, we’d only be listening to Beethoven. Electronic music has been about fun since its inception. Its been about using the aid from computers and synthesizers. So why not synthesize our voice? It can be fun, its pleasing to our ears, and has made many studio sessions faster and more streamlined in many cases. When I’m looking for a good time, when we want to dance, when we want to make synthesized non-organic music, Auto-Tune follows suit. 

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